Government & Defence

Water Services Officer

Water services officers are in charge of planning, regulating and delivering water resources for domestic, commercial or agricultural use.

  • Entry-level education

    Apprenticeship or traineeship

  • Job outlook

    1 2 3 4 5

What does a Water Services Officer do?

Water services officers are in charge of planning, regulating and delivering water resources for domestic, commercial or agricultural use.

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Work activities

As a water services officer, you would:

  • plan and order water deliveries
  • control the flow and distribution of water
  • closely monitor water storage levels in places such as reservoirs
  • carry out maintenance on water storage facilities and pumping stations
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Key skills and interests

To become a water services officer, you would need:

  • the ability to work independently
  • IT skills
  • to be physically fit
  • good communication skills
  • an understanding of health and safety regulations
  • a current drivers' licence.
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Working hours and conditions

Working Hours

As a water services officer you would work a standard number of hours per week, which may include being on an emergency call-out roster.

Conditions

Water services officers work for government bodies and state-owned water corporations. You would work from an office, and travel to visit sites. When on site, you would be working in all types of weather.

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How to become an Water Services Officer?

Entry Level Education

To become a water services officer, you usually have to complete a traineeship in Water Operations. Generally, employers require a junior secondary school certificate or equivalent.

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Job outlook

  • 1 2 3 4 5

Employment of water services officers is expected to grow about as fast as the average for all occupations.

Water services officers work for government bodies and corporations, and as such, employment opportunities will depend somewhat on government funding for roles. The water resources industry, across water resource management, water sharing and water trading, is becoming more heavily regulated, which may lead to greater opportunities for water services officers. Climate change will also have some effect on water resources and their associated management.

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